The engraving workshop / Scullion Architects in association with Plus Architecture

The engraving workshop / Scullion Architects in association with Plus Architecture

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© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy

Text description provided by the architects. The engraving workshop is located along the pedestrianized St Brendan’s Way, where the outskirts of the new TU Dublin Grangegorman campus meet the industrial landscape of the old railway station and Broadstone bus depot.

© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy

The engraving workshop was originally potentially intended to be provided in modular booths, as part of an unbiased and impartial options assessment undertaken for all capital projects on campus. During the early stages of our research, our team demonstrated better value for money with a specially designed, well-informed, robust and flexible solution that also offers a multitude of future uses. Economic benefits notwithstanding, a suitable environment would offer significant gains for end users, the university campus, and a significant social dividend for local communities.

© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy

A short delivery schedule required readily available, common, easy-to-build, and industry-familiar forms of construction to secure the competitive interest of a range of small and medium-scale contractors.

The structure includes repeating steel frame trusses on columns using standard steel sections wrapped in layers consisting of low cost thin metal cladding sheets, thick mineral wool insulation and steel cladding corrugated normally used on industrial buildings with rapid construction. The emphasis on economy of means and attention to the exterior edges of the building gives it a precision and refinement that is not normally associated with these types of buildings. Internally, we have developed a limited number of construction details that are simple but useful.

Sections
Sections

Subtle spatial characters such as lattice bottom chords, caryatid-style UC columns, movable walls on casters, and a fully glazed administrative annex to the south produce nodal points and room-like divisions that overlap in a simple enclosure. . L’Atelier was not conceived as a representation or a pastiche of industrial space. Instead, we were looking for a place of a specific character, a place of production, a place to be strongly engaged and changed with.

© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy

The sawtooth roof shape is optimally oriented, with three fully glazed north lights and south-facing sloping roofs housing a full range of 40 PV panels on the southernmost bay. Under the three central bays is the large main workshop with natural light for non-chemical processes, while the acid etching and aquatint, requiring controlled environments, take place in smaller technical rooms adjacent to the workshop north and south.

The distinctive building borders the pedestrianized St Brendan’s Way opposite the entrance to the East Quad which connects the campus to the Broadstone Luas stop. This privileged location allows street life to literally cut through university life. From St Brendan’s Way, full height windows allow you to see deep into the workshop. This means that the practical nature of the work of students and staff – increasingly rare in the current inclination towards virtual means of communication – is constantly highlighted.

© Aisling McCoy
© Aisling McCoy



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